Archive for the ‘Permaculture & Gardening’ Category

There are probably no other insects against which the United States military had to intervene except for the Rhinoceros coconut beetle. It happened just recently, in the Autumn of last year when the U.S. Navy had to respond to the “invasion” of these insects at the military base in Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The invasion left 175 trees infested and the military had to remove them.

The news made the headlines and got some good coverage but the infestation provoked by the Rhinoceros beetle was already creating important disturbance in many ecosystem in most of the subtropical and tropical of the planet.

The Asiatic rhinoceros beetle, known better as the Coconut rhinoceros beetle and scientifically as Oryctes rhinoceros, is a species of rhinoceros beetle belonging to the Scarabaeidae family according to Wikipedia.org. The rhinoceros beetle attacks the developing fronds of coconut, oil, and other palms in tropical Asia and a number of Pacific islands.

The damaged fronds show typical triangular cuts and the beetle kills the palms (particularly newly planted ones) when the growing point is destroyed during feeding. The larvae of the rhinoceros beetle, however, do not damage crops, but instead grow in dead, decaying trunks and other organic matter.

This beetle’s favorite habitats for breeding sites are dead, standing coconut trees and fallen coconut logs, but they can survive on many different types of decaying vegetation.

The eggs are laid in manure pits or other organic matter and hatch in 8-12 days according to recent studies. Larvae take another 82-207 days before entering an 8-13 day non feeding pre-pupal stage. The pupal stage goes between 17-28 days. The larvae is usually yellowish-white and can grow quite long, reaching almost 4 inches or more.  Adults remain in the pupal cell for 17-22 days before emerging and flying to palm crowns to feed. The beetles are active at night and hide in feeding or breeding sites during the day. Mostly mating takes place at the breeding sites. Adults may live for 4-9 months and each female lays 50-100 eggs during her lifetime.

Coconut rhinoceros beetles favor downed trees as breeding sites, so the mortality of young trees may be the first stage of a developing positive feedback cycle that would be essentially impossible to contain once initiated. To prevent this from happening young trees must be protected and dead ones must be cleared in areas of infestation.

Here at Jiwa Damai, being located in the island of Bali in Indonesia, we are also struggling to support the healthy growth of our coconut trees that have been in some cases infested by the rhinoceros beetle.

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In tackling this difficult issue for which there is no known cure at the moment we have developed by our own means and experience and collaborating with specialist from local and abroad a system in ten easy steps to help to coconut trees in our garden survive the invasion of the rhinoceros beetle.

The first step was identifying the problem and symptoms and ascertaining the presence of the rhinoceros beetle. We had found holes in the coconut tree trunk and the leaves of the coconut tree started to look brown and dead. That led us to believe that the Rhinoceros beetle had infected the coconut trees.

The second step was verifying the existence of the rhinoceros beetle in the coconut trees here at Jiwa Damai. There for we sent coconut climbers in the trees to check if the rhinoceros beetles have gone inside the coconut tree leaves. We also had to cut down some trees to see if the larva had infected the bottom part of their trunks. We found the Rhinoceros beetles and larvae from the trees thus ascertaining the infestation of our coconut trees with this insect. (more…)

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The coconut oil has so many healing powers that there is an actual coconut research center documenting them. The smell of the cold pressed coconut oil we produce at Jiwa Damai is filling our kitchen every time we are preparing the food for our guests. We believe that the smell itself is enough to make your day brighter.

It used to be believed that the coconut oil is unhealthy because of its high saturated fat content. However, now it is known that the fat in coconut oil is a unique and different from almost all other fats and possesses many health giving properties.

Here are just a few of the benefits which have been medically proven according to the coconut research center. (more…)

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As a part of their program at Jiwa DamaiKearene’s group from French Switzerland was also enjoying a permaculture introduction facilitated by our resident permaculture teacher. Some of the activities included learning to mulch. In the pictures you see different types of mulching. With paper, cardboard and with dry grass.

Introduction to permaculture at Jiwa Damai Introduction to permaculture at Jiwa Damai Introduction to permaculture at Jiwa Damai Introduction to permaculture at Jiwa Damai

Don’t forget to join our Permaculture Design Course Through the Heart in October.

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The Rhinoceros Beetles are a problem all over the world because these beautiful beetles attack the coconut trees. They have already devastated entire coconut cultures in Spain, Mallorca, Hawaii and Asia. No solution was found so far for fighting them.

At Jiwa Damai we are trying several approaches in order to strengthen the coconut trees. After thoroughly cleaning the leaves, a deep trench is made to uncover the feeder roots of the trees. We use our best compost for the roots and  afterwards we cover it with earth. The following day we water the trench with our compost tea.

 feeding the roots with best compost

We also tried to place bamboo sticks about 30 cm upright into the grounds. We fill them with compost and water them with our compost tea. (more…)

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One of the basic things we learn in permaculture is to be self-sustainable. Therefore, finding out how to make a compost is a must. This way one can reduce waste and create a nutritional soil for plants.

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The compost is created layering carbon, our dried leaves, nitrogen, green grass and ash and fruit scraps several times. It has to be turned every two days. Take care, it develops a great heat! On the 18th day the compost is done and exudes a pleasant soil like odor, ready to be used.

Compost at Jiwa Damai

Join us on the October 2015, Permaculture Design Course Through the Heart in order to learn by doing!

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Sometimes plants need more than healthy earth. At Jiwa Damai we also try alternative methods of taking care of the coconut trees which are attacked by the Rhinoceros Beetles, among other strategies, like feeding the roots and cleaning the leaves.

For instance, as science has already proven that water is influenced by emotions, by words or by thoughts, we try to help our coconut trees by hugging them. We send them our support thoughts and we ask them if there is something they might need. We also ask the Rhinoceros Beetles to retreat because they are harming the trees.

Coconut hugging

We are preparing a new Permaculture Design Course Through the Heart in October. Join us at Jiwa Damai!

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Nata I Ketut is smiling. He is always smiling but he was smiling even more when we told him about an interview for the Jiwa Damai blog. “We want people to meet you”, we told him! His eyes were big and full of light. “Ya?, he said. But which people?”.“Friends of Jiwa Damai who are reading our newsletter, our blog, our Facebook page”, we replied. He was not really sure why we were asking him all these questions but he wanted to help. The way he always does around Jiwa Damai.

Nata received a scholarship from Lagu Damai Bali foundation in order to pursue his interest in studying law at Universitas Warmadewa. He is also coming for two hours a week at Jiwa Damai to learn about permaculture and to help our gardener and volunteers.

lagu damai bali foundation student

The discussion was a mix of English and Bahasa Indonesia. We started by asking him about his studies.

I am studying civil law at Universitas Warmadewa in Bali. I started three years ago and I still have three years to go. I am really interested in the land law because I want to help the poor people of the village to organize better the community.

My dream was to study law and Lagu Damai Bali helped me to pursue it. It is a challenge (he really used the Indonesian word tantangan) but I think I can help other people by learning it and this motivates me”.

We also asked him about his work at Jiwa Damai.

“I like the way we are taking care of the plants at Jiwa Damai. I am still learning a lot about permaculture. I like the green of the leaves, the green of the trees, the green of the garden, it makes me happy.

In Bahasa Indonesia we say: “menanam banyak tanaman membuat keindahan didalam diri saya” which means, “creating a green space brings beauty inside my soul”.

At Jiwa Damai we are taking care both of our land, of our garden, of our plants and of our people and we do this whole-heartedly and we get all this love back. Come and feel it for yourself!

This month we are celebrating 13 years of activity through the heart at Lagu Damai Bali Foundation. Have you seen our video?

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Much of the Moringa plant is edible by humans or by farm animals. The leaves are rich in protein, vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin C, and minerals according to recent studies.  A 100-g portion of fresh Moringa leaves has 9.3 g protein, 434 mg calcium, 404 mg potassium, 738 mg vitamin A, and 164 mg vitamin C.

Moringa oleifera has all essential amino acids, beneficial fats and omega oils. Moringa is rich in calcium, iron and many other minerals, as well as a variety of vitamins, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances in big quantities but very few calories attached to it.

Moringa The Tree of Life

(more…)

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We are giving you some tips from our Permaculture Design Course Through the Heart, February 2015, but if you want to find out more, join us in October for a new PDC through the Heart at Jiwa Damai!

Did you know that worms like to eat fruit and veggies. They are not big fans of spicy and acidic foods, such as lemons or chilies.

Creating a worm factory

We invite you to keep in touch by following the Facebook page of Jiwa Damai.

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We find that planning ahead is never a bad idea. Hence we invite you to our Permaculture Design Course Through the Heart, in October 2015, at Jiwa Damai.

Experiencing Permaculture through the heart presents a unique opportunity to combine the theoretical Permaculture design method with “hands-on” experience, complementing active physical engagement with the soil with an inner attitude of appreciation and loving alignment with the earth.

This program is the first of its kind, working with the psychological framework of the mind, theoretical Permaculture principles, design and planning, planting, harvesting – all in alignment with the heart. It grounds the intellectual Permaculture approach through allowing a direct connection with the heart, a loving approach to ones Self, the other and the earth with its life-giving Flora and Fauna, to unfold.

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The 3 module design course content follows the standards, topics, and number of hours laid out by Bill Mollison , the founder of Permaculture. You will receive a Certificate of Completion as a Permaculture designer (72+ hrs). The course is complimented by a daily early morning yoga session and an evening heart meditation.

Module 1 Thur 01 – Wed 07 Oct 2015

Modules 1-3 Thur 01 – Wed 21 Oct 2015

Find out more about application procedure here. Or if you feel better talking to us, send an email at info [@] jiwadamai [.] net.

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