Posts Tagged ‘imo’

During the Permaculture Design Course Through the Heart in February 2015 we were happy to teach our students about a very useful local method of creating indigenous micro organisms – IMO.

Using a bamboo cut in half, you have to put boiled rice to fill it. After closing, it is buried in the earth and left there for 3 days to develop a healthy fungus. Then it is mixed with molasses and water to grow more IMO. Why is IMO important? Because it adds microbes to the soil in order to render it more fertile. Find out more here or here.

making imo

Also, don’t miss our photos on Jiwa Damai Facebook page!

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From Febuary 24th to March 12th we held our first Permaculture Design Certification Course at Jiwa Damai.
The group consisted of 30 participants coming from India, Australia, USA, Germany, Austria and Bali.

The internationally renowned teachers Rico Zook and Jeremiah Kidd did a great job in teaching the class.

One part of the PCD course was theoretical learning in the ‘classroom’.
Here the participants are introduced to the various flows in nature.

PDC class

The other part was practical hands-on-experience in the organic garden.
Here our group is learning to measure the PH content of the soil.

PH soil

During the 16 days course the participants were instructed to create IMO, indigenous microorganisms, using bamboo, cooked rice and sugar. This mixture needs to ferment for 4 days and then this fungus can be used to fertilize compost to create a larger stock.

IMO

These are some hand-made measurement instruments to properly measure size and topography of a land.

measurement instrument

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At Jiwa Damai we practice biological organic gardening. We clearly do not use any type of chemicals to fertilize our lands.

We use effective microorganisms for fertilization. Here we show you the Balinese way how to produce indiginous microorganisms. This is a fantastic technique !

Using cane sugar and cooked rice closed in a hollow bambu stick which is burried in the compost produces a flavourful yeast type fungus which is then mixed with the earth.

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