Posts Tagged ‘jiwa damai’

We were happy to celebrate the Indonesian Independence Day with an Open House event at Jiwa Damai in August. We know that it has been a while, but we want to share some of the images with you! Our team and their families began to come around 11 am. We used the pool until around 4 pm and plenty children games were organized.

Open House at Jiwa DAmai  (more…)

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During August we celebrated the Jiwa Damai Open House day and we are happy to share now some of those moments.

Early morning balloon blowing in preparation for our Open House at Jiwa Damai for our team and guests. They were given to the children of our local team members. It seems that the adults have much fun blowing them up as many were exploding as well 🙂

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Natalie, our intern in psychology at Jiwa Damai is an officer in the German army and a great athletic woman. She ran the famous 21 km Marathon in Bali with over 5000 participants. Next week she will also go to Java to participate in the Mount Bromo Nationale park marathon. Congratulations Natalie!

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Jiwa Damai offers it Balinese and Indonesian Team English classes during their lunch break. Here you see Sabine, our volunteer teaching an enthusiastic student body. This class is for English beginners, we also offer one for a bit more advanced students.
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Jiwa Damai is surrounded by beautiful ponds teeming with life. However, due to the ash coming down with the rain from the last volcanic eruption on the neighboring island, our stones in the pond, which are full with algae were covered completely with the ash. The fish feed on these algae and all of a sudden there was no food left. The ash also prevented the algae to receive light and hence they did not grow anymore.
We had to search for means how to remove  the ash from the stones. A water vacuum machine we bought did not do the trick.
The only other way was to empty the pond and clean it out. This was sad, since the pool had developed its own micro climate with its various inhabitants, and we had to destroy this. The stones were also the seat of many micro organisms, especially EM. Having this micro climate surrounding the buildings of Jiwa Damai, prevented mosquito larvae from hatching and both large buildings were nearly mosquito free.
Pond at JIwa DAmai
These ponds are the pride of Jiwa Damai, teeming with life, surrounding our main building and giving it its unique charme. They have a concrete base and the large river stones were added later to provide hiding for the fish and our eel as well as many crabs and frogs. To keep the water clear we had added many bags of Geolite, a stone in ground down form, which draws dirt to itself. All these needed to be considered

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Our lovely yoga teacher volunteer, Bee at Jiwa Damai is sharing some of her thoughts with you regarding her experience here. She has been our “busy bee” for the last couple of months helping us start the day with yoga in the morning and teaching our local team English. Originally from Austria, Bee has been traveling in order to find her path as a yoga instructor. We are very grateful for all the positive energy she has brought to this place.

You can find out more about our volunteer program here or just follow the stories from our volunteers on the Jiwa Damai blog. In the meantime, we invite you to discover the way Bee has experienced her stay at Jiwa Damai.

What made you chose Jiwa Damai?
I was searching for a place to practice yoga and to teach, for a healthy environment. I believe that yoga is a lifestyle and in order to follow it, you have to select carefully your surroundings. At the same time, it is hard to find a place where you can start with teaching when you don’t have prior experience. I was reading that Jiwa Damai is looking for volunteers and that they offer yoga in the morning so I thought that I could start to teach and also learn more about yoga here. The beautiful part is that they offered me this chance! I’ve been at Jiwa Damai for almost two months now. And I am happy to say that I had my first yoga students here.

yoga at Jiwa Damai Bali

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Sabine, our Austrian volunteer Yoga teacher is visiting our cat Orchid in her home the Garden Lumbung. Orchid has made this her home and is receiving every volunteer staying there with joyful greetings and meowing. She talks a lot and takes immediately to the warmest place where the person sleeps.
She is a great companion and extremely gentle.
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Final fire ceremony of our participants of the 24th days sadhana yoga teacher training in the gardens at the fireplace at Jiwa Damai. On this occasion the Certificats were adhered out as well as celebrating, chanting and dancing took place.

Yoga training at Jiwa Damai

We loved to have you here. For more information on further courses go on the website of Jiwa Damai, here.

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This month you will get to know our gardener planer who is taking care of the coconut trees and of the garden at Jiwa Damai.

Fendi our garden planer is feeding the roots of our coco palms to strengthen them against the Rhinoceros beetle. He inserts bamboo pipes into the earth about 1 1/2 m away from the trunk and fills it with compost tea to directly nourish the trees.

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Find out more about our work in the garden here! 

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There are probably no other insects against which the United States military had to intervene except for the Rhinoceros coconut beetle. It happened just recently, in the Autumn of last year when the U.S. Navy had to respond to the “invasion” of these insects at the military base in Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The invasion left 175 trees infested and the military had to remove them.

The news made the headlines and got some good coverage but the infestation provoked by the Rhinoceros beetle was already creating important disturbance in many ecosystem in most of the subtropical and tropical of the planet.

The Asiatic rhinoceros beetle, known better as the Coconut rhinoceros beetle and scientifically as Oryctes rhinoceros, is a species of rhinoceros beetle belonging to the Scarabaeidae family according to Wikipedia.org. The rhinoceros beetle attacks the developing fronds of coconut, oil, and other palms in tropical Asia and a number of Pacific islands.

The damaged fronds show typical triangular cuts and the beetle kills the palms (particularly newly planted ones) when the growing point is destroyed during feeding. The larvae of the rhinoceros beetle, however, do not damage crops, but instead grow in dead, decaying trunks and other organic matter.

This beetle’s favorite habitats for breeding sites are dead, standing coconut trees and fallen coconut logs, but they can survive on many different types of decaying vegetation.

The eggs are laid in manure pits or other organic matter and hatch in 8-12 days according to recent studies. Larvae take another 82-207 days before entering an 8-13 day non feeding pre-pupal stage. The pupal stage goes between 17-28 days. The larvae is usually yellowish-white and can grow quite long, reaching almost 4 inches or more.  Adults remain in the pupal cell for 17-22 days before emerging and flying to palm crowns to feed. The beetles are active at night and hide in feeding or breeding sites during the day. Mostly mating takes place at the breeding sites. Adults may live for 4-9 months and each female lays 50-100 eggs during her lifetime.

Coconut rhinoceros beetles favor downed trees as breeding sites, so the mortality of young trees may be the first stage of a developing positive feedback cycle that would be essentially impossible to contain once initiated. To prevent this from happening young trees must be protected and dead ones must be cleared in areas of infestation.

Here at Jiwa Damai, being located in the island of Bali in Indonesia, we are also struggling to support the healthy growth of our coconut trees that have been in some cases infested by the rhinoceros beetle.

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In tackling this difficult issue for which there is no known cure at the moment we have developed by our own means and experience and collaborating with specialist from local and abroad a system in ten easy steps to help to coconut trees in our garden survive the invasion of the rhinoceros beetle.

The first step was identifying the problem and symptoms and ascertaining the presence of the rhinoceros beetle. We had found holes in the coconut tree trunk and the leaves of the coconut tree started to look brown and dead. That led us to believe that the Rhinoceros beetle had infected the coconut trees.

The second step was verifying the existence of the rhinoceros beetle in the coconut trees here at Jiwa Damai. There for we sent coconut climbers in the trees to check if the rhinoceros beetles have gone inside the coconut tree leaves. We also had to cut down some trees to see if the larva had infected the bottom part of their trunks. We found the Rhinoceros beetles and larvae from the trees thus ascertaining the infestation of our coconut trees with this insect. (more…)

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