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Clean shine pool

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Once every four months our great pool get a thorough cleaning at the inside. Here two of our great volunteers are doing the job, and enjoying themselves as well.

Open House Swimming

During our once a year open house for all friends and the #Jiwa Damai team, we open the pool at 11 am. While the adults were mostly watching, the kids were trying their first contacts with water and seemingly enjoyed it.swim 1 swim 3 swim 2

House temple

The #Jiwa#Damai Team was invited to visit the ceremony of this particular house temple.
Each Balinese compound owns and takes great care of the family temple.The ceremony was a very important one. One which happens every 30 years only. So it was a big ceremony.Nyoman, our

Jiwa Damai team member had already taken leave a month before to be able to prepare adequately for this important day. Aside form the many offerings (including ritual sacrifice of many animals) all was wrapped in beautiful golden and white colors.
Every balinese compound has it own house temple. The #Jiwa#Damai Team was invited to visit the ceremony of this particular house temple.

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Organic and raw food

Our kitchen is presently experimenting with  #raw#foods  . A wonderful fresh fruit smoothie combination of banana, papaya and watermelon, a plate with zucchini spaghetti, guacamole and raw tomato sauce.
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Breakfast consisted of Jiwa Damai #organic fruit, banana, guava, and our coconut crisps and almonds, complimented by a stuffed date.

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Papaya

While most people throw them away, papaya seeds are not only edible, small amounts of them in your diet can be surprisingly good for you.
Keep in mind though that chewing half a teaspoon of the seeds is not like eating papaya fruit. They have a strong flavor, more like a cross between mustard and black peppercorns.
If you can handle that, ahead are some of the main health benefits of papaya seeds, followed by some interesting ways to add them to your diet.

Papaya Seeds, Worms and Other Parasitic Infections

Like green papaya, the seeds contain high levels of proteolytic enzymes like papain which can help rid your body of parasites. In the same way that papain breaks down undigested protein waste in your food, it may also break down parasites and their eggs.
Good levels of digestive enzymes in your diet are also believed to help normalize the environment in your intestinal tract, making it less hospitable to worms and other parasites. Enzyme rich green papaya capsules are a simple alternative if you don’t have the fresh fruit available.
The seeds from papaya also contain a unique anthelmintic alkaloid called carpaine that has been shown to be very effective at killing parasitic worms and amoebas. There is much more detail on the human parasite problem and a great tasting smoothie treatment to get rid of them in using papaya seeds for parasites and intestinal worms.

Papaya Seeds as a Treatment for Liver Cirrhosis

Liver cirrhosis is a disease, usually caused by excessive alcohol consumption over many years, wherein the liver shrinks and becomes hardened. In this state it is ineffective at removing toxins from the body, leading to a variety of serious health problems.
Papaya seeds are often reported as an effective treatment for liver cirrhosis. One method is to grind up around five dried seeds in a pepper grinder, or crush up fresh ones in a mortar and pestle, and mix them with a tablespoon of fresh lime juice. Drink this papaya seed treatment down twice a day for a month. Many cirrhosis sufferers have had dramatic improvements with this powerful natural remedy.
Obviously consult your doctor first if you are being treated for cirrhosis of the liver, especially with regards to the papain enzyme that may interfere with medications.
Even for people without such obvious liver damage, a small amount of pawpaw seeds taken regularly is said to help with liver detoxification. And anything that can improve the vital functions of the liver will be likely to improve your health in general.

Antibacterial Properties

Papaya Seeds Pregnancy
Another one of the uses of papaya seeds could be to prevent or possibly even treat food poisoning. The seeds of papaya are believed to have a strong antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effect on our digestive systems. Studies have shown an extract made from them is effective at killing E coli, Salmonella, Staph and other dangerous bacterial infections.
Once again, their potent digestive enzymes like papain can help change the intestinal environment to one that is more favorable to the ‘good’ bacteria and less so to the bad ones that can cause so many digestive issues and health problems.
There are even reports of using papaya seeds to successfully treating viral infections such as Dengue fever in parts of Central America like Costa Rica. Obviously this is a serious disease so consult a knowledgeable healthcare professional before using pawpaw seeds if you contract Dengue fever.

Precautions and Warnings

As a precaution, pregnant women should not use papaya seeds or the enzyme rich green papaya. This warning on their use would also extend to breastfeeding. Additionally, while papaya seeds do have strong anti-parasitic properties, they may be too powerful for young children’s gastrointestinal tracts, so a doctor should be consulted before giving them to infants.

There is also some animal research suggesting that eating papaya seeds may temporarily but greatly reduce a man’s fertility to the point that would make pregnancy unlikely. I’ll leave it up to male readers whether they currently consider that a good or bad thing. There’s a detailed look at the contraceptive potential of papaya seeds for men here if you’re interested.
The side effects and potential warnings for using papaya enzymes on the previous page would also especially apply to papaya seeds as well so keep that in mind if you are currently dealing with any of the health conditions mentioned there.
The benefits of papaya seeds, with their high levels of digestive enzymes, antibacterial, anti-parasitic and liver regenerating properties are powerful. You don’t need many at a time, certainly not a whole fruit’s worth. After you scrape them out of a fresh fruit, it’s best to keep them in a sealed container in the fridge if you’re using them regularly, or in the freezer if only occasionally.
I hope this article has helped to spread the word that papaya seeds are edible and potentially good for you in small doses or as specific treatment. The next page will look at how to use papaya seeds for better digestive health, including some unusual ways to add them into your diet.

PAPAYA

Carica papaya L.

Caricaceae

Common Names: Papaya, Papaw or Paw Paw (Australia), Mamao (Brazil), Tree Melon.Related Species: Babaco (Carica pentagona), Mountain Papaya (C. pubescens), Chamburo (C. stipulata).

Origin: The papaya is believed to be native to southern Mexico and neighboring Central America. It is now present in every tropical and subtropical country.

Adaptation: Papayas have exacting climate requirements for vigorous growth and fruit production. They must have warmth throughout the year and will be damaged by light frosts. Brief exposure to 32° F is damaging and prolonged cold without overhead sprinkling will kill the plants. Cold, wet soil is almost always lethal. Cool temperatures will also alter fruit flavor. Papayas make excellent container and greenhouse specimens where soil moisture and temperature can be moderated.

DESCRIPTION

Growth Habit: The papaya is a short-lived, fast-growing, woody, large herb to 10 or 12 feet in height. It generally branches only when injured. All parts contain latex. The hollow green or deep purple trunk is straight and cylindrical with prominent leaf scars. Its diameter may be from 2 or 3 inches to over a foot at the base.Foliage: The leaves emerge directly from the upper part of the stem in a spiral on nearly horizontal petioles 1 to 3-1/2 feet long. The blade, deeply divided into 5 to 9 main segments, varies from 1 to 2 feet in width, and has prominent yellowish ribs and veins. The life of a leaf is 4 to 6 months.

Flowers: The five-petalled flowers are fleshy, waxy and slightly fragrant. Some plants bear only short-stalked female flowers, or bisexual (perfect) flowers also on short stalks, while others may bear only male flowers, clustered on panicles 5 or 6 feet long. Some plants may have both male and female flowers. Others at certain seasons produce short-stalked male flowers, at other times perfect flowers. This change of sex may occur temporarily during high temperatures in midsummer. Male or bisexual plants may change completely to female plants after being beheaded. Certain varieties have a propensity for producing certain types of flowers. For example, the Solo variety has flowers of both sexes 66% of the time, so two out of three plants will produce fruit, even if planted singly. How pollination takes place in papayas is not known with certainty. Wind is probably the main agent, as the pollen is light and abundant, but thrips and moths may assist. Hand pollination is sometimes necessary to get a proper fruit set.

Fruit: There are two types of papayas, Hawaiian and Mexican. The Hawaiian varieties are the papayas commonly found in supermarkets. These pear-shaped fruit generally weigh about 1 pound and have yellow skin when ripe. The flesh is bright orange or pinkish, depending on variety, with small black seeds clustered in the center. Hawaiian papayas are easier to harvest because the plants seldom grow taller than 8 feet. Mexican papayas are much larger the the Hawaiian types and may weigh up to 10 pounds and be more than 15 inches long. The flesh may be yellow, orange or pink. The flavor is less intense than that the Hawaiian papaya but still is delicious and extremely enjoyable. They are slightly easier to grow than Hawaiian papayas. A properly ripened papaya is juicy, sweetish and somewhat like a cantaloupe in flavor, although musky in some types. The fruit (and leaves) contain papain which helps digestion and is used to tenderize meat. The edible seeds have a spicy flavor somewhat reminiscent of black pepper.

CULTURE

Location: Papayas like to be warm with both sunshine and reflected heat, so the hottest place against the house where nothing else seems happy is an ideal location. They also like to be as free from wind as possible, although this is not as critical as their need for sun. Papayas can be grown successfully in shade, but the fruit is rarely sweet. They are best planted in mounds or against the foundation of a building where water can be controlled.Soils: Papayas need a light, well-drained soil. They are easily killed by excess moisture. The soil needs to be moist in hot weather and dry in cold weather. Since this is the opposite of California’s rain pattern, in addition to good drainage, plastic coverings to prevent over-wetting in winter may also be worthwhile. Papayas do not tolerate salty water or soil.

Irrigation: Watering is the most critical aspect in raising papayas. The plants should be kept on to the dry side to avoid root rot, but also need enough water to support their large leaves. In winter the plant prefers to remain as dry as possible. A plant that has been injured by frost is particularly susceptible to root rot.

Fertilization: The fast-growing papaya requires regular applications of nitrogen fertilizers but the exact rates have not been established. Feed monthly and adjust according to the plant’s response. They can take fairly hot organic fertilizing such as chicken manure if used with deep irrigation after warm weather has started. Phosphorus deficiency casuses dark green foliage with a reddish-purple discoloration of leaf veins and stalks.

Pruning: Papayas do not need to be pruned, but some growers pinch the seedlings or cut back established plants to encourage multiple trunks.

Frost Protection: Papayas need warmth and a frost-free environment, but can often withstand light freezes with some kind of overhead protection. This can be provided by building a frame around the plants and covering it with bedding, plastic sheeting, etc. when frost threatens. Electric light bulbs can also be used for added warmth. Potted specimens can be moved to a frost-secure area. Prolonged cold, even if it does not freeze, may adversely affect the plants and the fruit. Mexican papayas are more hardy than Hawaiian varieties.

Propagation: Papayas are normally propagated by seed. To start a plant, extract the seeds from ripe papayas and wash them to remove the gelatinous covering. They are then dried, dusted with a fungicide and planted as soon as possible (the seeds loose their viability rapidly in storage). Plant the seeds in warm (80° F), sterile potting mix. Seeds should be planted in sterile soil as young papaya seedlings have a high mortality rate from damping off. Potting soil can be sterilized by mixing 50-50 with vermiculite and placing in an oven at 200° F for one hour. Under ideal conditions the seeds may germinate in about two weeks, but may take three to five weeks. Gibberellic acid can be used to speed up germination in some seasons. Seedlings usually begin flowering 9 – 12 months after they germinate.

Seedling papayas do not transplant well. Plant them in large containers so the seedlings will have to be transplanted only once, when they go into the ground. Transplant carefully, making sure not to damage the root ball. To prevent damping off, drench the potting mix with a fungicide containing benomyl or captan. Set the plants a little high to allow for settling. A plastic mulch will help keep the soil warm and dry in wet winter areas, but remove it as soon as the weather becomes warm. Plant at least three or four plants to insure yourself of having females or plant hermaphroditic plants.

Papaya plants can also be grown from cuttings, which should be hardened off for a few days and then propped up with the tip touching moist, fertile soil until roots form. Semihardwood cuttings planted during the summer root rapidly and should fruit the following year.

Pests and diseases: Thrips, mites and white flies as well as In red spider and fruit spotting bugs are potential problems in some areas. The plants may also be attacked by mildew, anthracnose, root rot and various virus diseases Fruit flies often ruin the fruit in Florida and Hawaii. Nematodes can attack the roots and are often a factor in the decline of individual plant. Gopher damage can be avoided by planting in wire baskets. Papaya plants should probably be replaced every 4 years or so.

Harvest: Papayas are ready to harvest when most of the skin is yellow-green. After several days of ripening at room temperature, they will be almost fully yellow and slightly soft to the touch. Dark green fruit will not ripen properly off the tree, even though it may turn yellow on the outside. Mature fruit can be stored at 45° F for about 3 weeks. Papayas are often sliced and eaten by themselves or served with a myriad of other foods. They can also be cooked to make chutney or various desserts. Green papayas should not be eaten raw because of the latex they contain, although they are frequently boiled and eaten as a vegetable. In the West Indies, young leaves are cooked and eaten like spinach. In India, seeds are sometimes used as an adulterant in whole black pepper.

CULTIVARS

Kamiya
A selection from Waimanalo. Solo type. Small to medium-sized fruit. Distinct, blocky shape, very short neck. Deep yellow-orange skin and flesh, firm, juicy, very sweet. Dwarf, high-yielding plant. Fairly recent release from the University of Hawaii.
Mexican Red
A rose-fleshed papaya that is lighter in flavor than Mexican Yellow. Medium to very large fruit. Generally not as sweet as Hawaiian types
Mexican Yellow
A very sweet and flavorful, yellow-fleshed papaya. Medium to large fruit, can grow up to 10 pounds. Generally not as sweet as Hawaiian types.
Solo
Fruit round and shallowly furrowed in female plants, pear-shaped in bisexual plants. Weight 1.1 to 2.2 pounds. Skin smooth, flesh firm, reddish-orange, very sweet, of excellent quality. Produces no male plants, only bisexual and female in a 2 to 1 ratio. Introduced into Hawaii from Barbados in 1911. Named Solo in 1919.
Sunrise (Sunrise Solo)
Pear-shaped fruit with a slight neck. Averages 22 to 26 ounces depending on location. Skin smooth, flesh firm, reddish-orange, sweet, sugar content high. Quality similar to Solo. Seed cavity not as deeply indented as other Solo strains, making seed removal easier. Plant precocious, maturing fruit about 9 months after transplanting, at a height of about 3 feet.
Sunset (Sunset Solo)
Solo type. Small to medium-sized, pear-shaped fruit. Orange-red skin and flesh. Very sweet. Dwarf, high yielding plant. Originated at the University of Hawaii.
Vista Solo
Medium to large fruit depending on climate, 5 inches wide, up to 18 inches long. Skin yellow, flesh orange to yellow-orange. Hardy, compact Solo type producing high quality fruit. Needs fairly hot weather to develop sweetness. Self-fertile. Originated in Vista, Calif. by Ralph Corwin.
Waimanalo (Waimanalo Solo, X-77)
Fruit round with a short neck, average weight 16 to 39 ounces. Skin smooth, and glossy, cavity star-shaped. Flesh thick, firm, orange-yellow in color, flavor and quality high, keeps well. Recommended for fresh market and processing. Fruits of female plants rough in appearance. Average height to the first flower is 32 inches.


To establish a healthy permaculture garden or farm takes dedication, knowledge about design and plants, space and time and, last but not least, a big heart. Each individual element, in order to compose a healthy whole, has to be placed in its proper place. Compost, one of the major miracle workers for plants, needs time to ripen in order for its full nourishing potential to unfold. Often the earth needs time to recuperate from previous abuse and usage of chemicals. In turn, trees, bushes, veggies and other nutritious elements need time to grow and proliferate, for their fruit to ripen, and to eventually fulfill their purpose and potential. They grow together, developing quite an energetic interaction that one might call social life, with likes and dislikes towards each other. Some plants further and some hinder each other’s growth.

As human beings, we follow a similar rhythm and path of individual growth. We require proper nourishment, physically, mentally and spiritually, to grow, ripen and unfold our true potential. Of course, this could ideally happen in alignment with nature and earth, while establishing the permaculture garden step-by-step. The connecting link here is the unfolding of the qualities of the heart. This process allows for a deeper connection with one’s inner voice and innate guidance. Listening carefully within allows the finer sensory perceptions and inner sense perceptions to be brought into consciousness. This then guides one towards the deeper, innermost Self, the unlimited potential of individual growth. Values and qualities, such as appreciation of one’s Self, honoring the inner life, trust, and the joy of being embodied, become manifest.

Once I honor and appreciate myself I can interconnect with, honor and appreciate others and the gifts of nature. Here is where the permaculture design method can come in, in a very powerful way. While I use and apply this thoughtful and intelligent design method to the land and earth, hands-on, touching the life-giving soil, my increased inner perception and my honoring of each plant, soil and living being can vibrate in alignment. True communication can take place. As research has shown for quite some time, plants and trees cared for with love vibrate, respond and growth unfolds differently. This research has been photographed and might be worth examining (Dr. Korotkov, Konstantin – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzcdxJYYzv4). The soil, with its microcosm of aerobic and anaerobic inhabitants, will also respond to this increased flow of positive energy. If I resonate within my own being, the heart’s energy will vibrate throughout my own cellular system, improving and allowing its potential to unfold. (see Heart Math – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdneZ4fIIHE)

The same is valid for the earth, soil, and plants, as well as my influence on the environment and others. The personal process working in conscious alignment with the earth has a powerful impact on personal life, the environment and the entire earth. I can no longer say I am powerless. Each one of my actions impacts the whole.

Christopher Columbus, an Italian voyager once referred to papayas as the fruit of the angels. The fruit which is extremely rich in Vitamin C has a wide range of health benefits making it a great fruit option to include in your diet. Here are some of the top health benefits of papaya.

1. Lowers cholesterol

Papaya is rich in fibre, Vitamin C and antioxidants which prevent cholesterol build up in your arteries. Too much cholesterol build-up can lead to several heart diseases including heart attack and hypertension.

2.  Helps in weight loss

Those looking to lose weight must include papaya in their diet as it is very low in calories. The fibre content in papaya leaves you feeling full and also clears your bowel movement making your weight loss regime easier.

3.  Boosts your immunity

Your immunity system acts as a shield against various infections that can make you really sick. A single papaya contains more than 200% of your daily requirement of Vitamin C, making it great for your immunity.

4.  Good for diabetics

Papaya is an excellent food option for diabetics as it has a low-sugar content even though it is sweet to taste. Also, people who don’t have diabetes can eat papaya to prevent it from happening. .

5.  Great for your eyes

Papaya is rich in Vitamin A which helps protect your vision from degenerating. Nobody wants to lose their ability to see due to diseases like age-related macular degeneration, and eating papayas will ensure that you do not see a day where you cannot see.

6.  Protects against arthritis

Arthritis can be a really debilitating disease and people who have it may find their quality of life reduced significantly. Eating papayas are good for your bones as they have anti-inflammatory properties along with Vitamin C which helps in keeping various forms of arthritis at bay. A study published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases showed that people who consumed foods low in Vitamin C were three times more likely to have arthritis than those who didn’t.

7.  Improves digestion

In today’s times, it is near impossible to avoid eating foods that are bad for your digestive system. Often we find ourselves eating junk food or restaurant food prepared in excessive quantities of oil. Eating a papaya daily can make up for such occasional mistakes, as it has a digestive enzyme known as papain along with fibre which helps improve your digestive health.

8.  Helps ease menstrual pain

Women who are experiencing menstrual pain should help themselves to several servings of papaya, as an enzyme called papain helps in regulating and easing flow during menstrual periods.

9.  Prevents signs of ageing

All of us would love to stay young forever, but no one in this world has managed to do it. Still, healthy habits like eating a papaya daily will prolong the process and may make you look 5 years younger than you are. Papaya is rich in Vitamin C, Vitamin E and antioxidants like beta-carotene which helps prevent your skin from free radical damage keeping wrinkles and other signs of ageing at bay.

10.  Prevents cancer

Papaya is a rich source of antioxidants, phytonutrients and flavonoids that prevent your cells from undergoing free radical damage. Some studies have also linked the consumption papaya to reduced risk of colon and prostate cancer.

11.  Helps reduce stress

After working hard for the whole day, it is a good idea to come home to a plate a papayas. The wonder fruit is rich in several nutrients like Vitamin C which can keep you free from stress. According to a study conducted in University of Alabama, found that 200 mg of Vitamin C can help regulate the flow of stress hormones in rats.

All of this makes papaya a wholesome fruit that is excellent for your entire body.

 

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